Tricked and Indebted on Land, Abused or Abandoned at Sea unveils abuse of Filipino seafarers

Tricked and Indebted on Land, Abused or Abandoned at Sea unveils abuse of Filipino seafarers

When Eril Andrade left this small village, he was healthy and hoping to earn enough on a fishing boat on the high seas to replace his mother’s leaky roof.

Seven months later, his body was sent home in a wooden coffin: jet black from having been kept in a fish freezer aboard a ship for more than a month, missing an eye and his pancreas, and covered in cuts and bruises, which an autopsy report later concluded had been inflicted before death.

Story from Ian Urbina, New York Times.

It Can Wait: Pledge to Keep Your Eyes on the Road, Not on Your Phone.

It Can Wait: Pledge to Keep Your Eyes on the Road, Not on Your Phone.

Pledge to keep your eyes on the road, not on your phone.

Take the pledge and pass it on in September!

One glance down at your phone can change everything. AT&T recently released research that found that seven in 10 people engage in smartphone activities while driving. As part of the expansion of It Can Wait to include more smartphone distractions, AT&T released new videos that show the potentially deadly consequence of even glancing at your phone while driving.

FWN is proud to support AT&T’s It Can Wait campaign!

Women in Sports: 17 Year Old Pinay Mayumi Pacheco Drives with a Force for Liverpool FC

Women in Sports: 17 Year Old Pinay Mayumi Pacheco Drives with a Force for Liverpool FC

There is a young Filipina making waves in the Football Association’s Women’s Super League, the highest league of women’s football in England, and she is 17-year-old Mayumi “Maz” Pacheco.

The young defender has already represented England in the Women’s Under-16s and Under-17s levels. She was also called up for the England Under-19s team, but due to her first team commitment, she has to miss the camps and was instead told by the coach to be physically and mentally prepared for next year’s Under 19s competition.

News story courtesy of Interaksyon

Filipina-American Journalist Cielo Buenaventura at the New York Times

Filipina-American Journalist Cielo Buenaventura at the New York Times

For Filipina-American journalist Cielo Buenaventura, getting into The New York Times and now holding the title of staff editor for the Culture section, was a combination of “audacious dreaming and dumb luck.”

In 1988 while on a scholarship at Ohio State University, one of her professors, a former Times editor, suggested that she try to apply to the paper after completing her master’s degree in public-affairs reporting and acquiring experience from small and medium-size papers . She said to herself, “Wow, the NYT was like Mount Everest, the mountain I’ll never be able to climb.” But he planted the idea in her head.

The Albay-born Cielo is one of two Filipinos at The Times newsroom. The other is restaurant critic Ligaya Mishan, whose mother is a Filipino immigrant.

“I learned on the job,” Cielo shared during a June 26 Kapihan forum organized by the Fil-Am Press Club of New York, where she was the guest speaker. “I didn’t have the Harvard, Yale and Ivy League credentials that other people had. But I found that The Times is a collegial place.”

News story courtesy of TheFilAm.net

 

10 Books by Filipina Authors

10 Books by Filipina Authors

Delve and savor literature by Pinay writers in time for this year's Third Filipino American International Book Festival in San Francisco (October 2nd-4th). Afterall, women have been writing amazing books about Filipino life and culture for as long as we can remember, and it makes no sense that our attentions be skewed so heavily in favor of the men’s. For the sake of those who need a greater push into spotlight, FilipiKNOW.net features 10 Filipino women writers whose works you definitely have to read.

News story courtesy of FilipiKNOW.net

It's Time for a Woman to be on the $20 Bill - Sign the Petition

It's Time for a Woman to be on the $20 Bill - Sign the Petition

Months ago, a national campaign was launched to get a woman's portrait on the $20.  The goal of this historic campaign was to honor American women.  2020 is the 100th anniversary of women in the United States winning the right to vote.  Having a woman on the $20 would be part of this important historic celebration. 

We need 100,000 signature to get the attention of the White House. Please add your name to the petition asking the White House and the Treasury to properly respond to the Women on 20s petition and put a woman's portrait on the $20 bill!

From the The National Women's History Project


 

Filipino Film "Imbisibol" Debuts at Toronto International Film Festival

Filipino Film "Imbisibol" Debuts at Toronto International Film Festival

Director Lawrence Fajardo’s film Imbisibol (Invisible), which had its international debut at the Toronto Film Festival yesterday, tells the stories of four OFWs living in the city of Fukuoka in the aftermath of a 1989 Japanese crackdown on overstayers – workers who remain in the country after their work contracts expire.

“That’s why we chose the title,” says producer Krisma Fajardo, who is also Lawrence’s wife. “They’re not supposed to be in Japan. Legally they’re not there. And then they’re also not in the Philippines, physically, so it’s like they’re invisible. These people tend to lay low and not attract ­attention.”

News story courtesy of The National

Filipino Food Hits the Mainstream

Filipino Food Hits the Mainstream

Filipino immigrants have struggled to have much impact on mainstream U.S. culture, especially around food and drink. The problem is compounded, Ponseca adds, by a well-documented trait: It’s called “hiya” (pronounced “hee-yah” in Tagalog), and the word translates into English as “shame” or “dishonor.” Some Filipino immigrants in America have felt a sense of hiya around their food, with its duck embryos, pig’s blood, shrimp paste and other potentially hard-to-swallow ingredients.

News story courtesy of Washington Post